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JazzBulletin   -   Thursday July 20 2017 to Wednesday July 26 2017

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SJNPRO Bulletin

For jazz musicians and professionals

Interviews with Hiromi, MISC, Stacey Kent, Kenny Barron, Jacques Kuba Séguin, Frédéric Alarie, Christian Scott - Elena Pinderhugues, Bilal, Joey DeFrancesco and Cyrille Aimée (to come)

 
Check out our Interviews with Hiromi, MISC, Stacey Kent, Kenny Barron, Jacques Kuba Séguin, Frédéric Alarie, Christian Scott - Elena Pinderhugues, Bilal, Joey DeFrancesco and Cyrille Aimée (to come)
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hiromi_spark.jpgSparks are gonna fly with virtuoso pianist Hiromi and her Power Trio, Thursday, June 30th at Montreal's Jazz Fest.
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I caught up with pianist Hiromi late at night in her Melbourne hotel room as she was getting ready for that's city's jazz festival concert with her Power Trio made up of double bassist Anthony Jackson as well as drummer Simon Phillips. She'll be at Montreal's Jazz Fest this June 30th with the same project, four years after her last visit to the Festival, with Spark, her 10th album, released in April. We spoke about what ignites her, the playlist of the concert, her influences in so many genres, improvisation, the power trio and her musicians, technology and music, whom she'd like to play with, what she's listening to, and eating and travelling.
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CT - Hiromi, you titled your last album, your 10th, Spark - where does the spark come from? what ignites you?
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Hiromi - "I can come from anywhere, life is full of sparks, it's all up to you if you can find it or not. You can always find little sparks from so many things, beautiful landscapes, great conversations, as well as performing..."
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CT - Your music is a mix of rock, jazz, classical with roots in jazz...are you influenced by all those genres?
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Hiromi  - "I think so, I grew up listeting to all kinds of great music, so whenever I hear great music, I'm inspired. I've been listening to jazz since I was eight as my first piano teacher happenedto be a big fan of jazz music.."
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CT - In your music, how do you balance the "written" parts and the "improvised" parts?
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Hiromi - "I like to leave a lot of room for improvisation. We perform so many shows and I want it to be free and enjoy it, we want to feel like we don't really know where we're going, and I like that feeling."
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CT - Tell us what you'll be playing as well the musicians that complete the Power Trio : bassist Anthony Jackson as drummer Simon Phillips...
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Hiromi - "We'll be playing mostly music from Spark. Anthony played on my debut album as well as my 2nd album as a special guest, he'd played a couple of songs on that album and I always wanted to make a full album with him, we'd talked about that for many many years and in 2010 it felt like the right time. So I started writing songs imagining a trio and the more I wrote the music the more the sound of the drummer that I wanted to play with became clear. At that time I thought about Simon, Anthony and Simon had been playing together for many years. Anthony thought it was a great idea, I gave Simon a call and he was very excited to be part of it. So we formed a trio now going on six years and four albums."
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CT - How do you see the future of music in this technology-driven and online-driven musical environment?
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Hiromi - "I just think that whatever I think, there's not much I can do about it. The only thing that will not change are live performances. Of course it hurts when people listen to music for free because we can't make it free, it costs money to record and play music. When and if people take it for granted, then it hurts. If it can be a gateway in between the artist and the audience, and if it opens new doors for them to come to the show, live shows are one of the most hopeful things for musicians for now, and if it can expand, then it's a good thing."
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CT - If you had the opportunity to play with an artist/musician, dead or alive / who would it be?
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Hiromi - "Frank Zappa."
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CT - What music are you listening to these days?
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Hiromi - "Well I bought some music from Frank Zappa's website that I just received, so that's what I'm listeting to."
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CT - I visited your blog and it seems for each important concert there is a post with a picture of the concert and always a great looking meal...is eating well and staying healthy something important for you or are you just loving great food?
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Hiromi - "I love eating good food. We travel so much and we don't get to see the city much, so eating local food is one of the things that makes me feel like I'm travelling. Of course we're going from the airport to the hotel and to the concert as well as meeting the audience in so many different parts of the world. But it's always nice to have one additional thing to make a certain place differentiate itself, with certains foods like paella in Spain or spaghetti vongole in Italy. Then I really feel like I'm in a different country."
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Interview : Claude Thibault
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Hiromi
Thursday, June 30th 2016 - 8pm
For more info on this concert, click here
To see the Spark EPK, click here
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entrevuemisc.jpgMISC - interview and music in concert in the Jazz d'ici series, at L'Astral, Sunday July 2nd.
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We met MISC, the ex-Jérôme Beaulieu Trio and spoke, mixed-in with some footage of Messenger, Respirer dans l'eau and Les années molles this spring at their La Sala Rossa launch.

With Jérôme Beaulieu (piano), William Côté (drums) and Philippe Leduc (bass), we spoke about their new name and where they're at, the March 22nd launch and their 7 to 77 year old public, their vision of music, the music of Daniel Bélanger - Respirer dans l'eau and their take on that, William's beard, Philippe unharnessed drive, Les années molles and their social vision according to  Jérôme...

To see the interview (in french) click here

To see Les années molles click here

Interview : Ralph Boncy
Camera/editing : Claude Thibault
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MISC is in concert, Sunday July 2nd in the Jazz d'ici series, at L'Astral part of the Montreal Jazz Fest
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stacey_kent_micro.jpgStacey Kent sings Tenderly, Sunday, July 3rd at Montreal's Jazz Fest.
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Singer Stacey Kent will be presenting her latest CD, Tenderly, at the Montreal's Jazz Fest this Sunday, July 3rd. I exchanged by email with Stacey on this upcoming concert, Roberto Menescal, Brazil, the repertoire, her musicians, her love of languages, and more...
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CT - Stacey, after working with bossa nova singer/guitarist/songwriter Roberto Menescal on The Changing Lights, you've re-connected with Roberto for Tenderly...what's different on this project?
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Stacey - "The Changing Lights was an album of Brazilian or Brazilian-inspired music. When we were working on it, Roberto said that he'd never made a jazz album before and that he’d love to record one with me. He's a big fan of Barney Kessel and loves the albums that BK made with Julie London. So Tenderly is the realization of that idea. It's an album of standards performed in a very intimate and minimalist way. Ironically, it's a very "Bossa Nova" style record because it's all about the relationship of the voice and guitar and even playing standards, Roberto, one of the father’s of Bossa Nova, brings that Bossa sensibility to his approach to swing and ballads."
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CT - What originally drew you to the brazilian music? Is it the beautiful phonetics of the brazilian language?  Or is the suave bossa-nova grooves?
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Stacey  - "Really, it's all of that. Even before I understood Portuguese, the sound of the language is so lyrical. Brazilian music - and Bossa Nova in particular - has all the chromaticism that I love in its melodies and harmonies. It also has that close relationship to samba. It's a music that is capable of communicating joy and sadness at the same time."
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CT - Can you tell us a bit about the repertoire and how you chose it? Was that easy or not?
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Stacey - "For Tenderly, the repertoire was mostly Roberto's choice. The song, If I'm Lucky was my choice. It's something I've always wanted to record and this was the ideal opportunity."
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CT - Tell us about the great musicians you'll be playing with on July 3rd and your complicity with them...
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Stacey - "In Montreal I'll be with Art Hirahara, a great pianist from California who lives in New York. I've been playing with Art for many years. He's a great accompanist and soloist. On bass is Tom Hubbard. Tom has played with everyone. He has a great groove and instinct for playing what feels right for the moment. On the saxes and flutes will be Jim Tomlinson! People who know my music, know Jim’s, too. We have a musically symbiotic relationship, it continues to be a great dialogue between us. As well as a player in the band, he is also my record producer and arranger, and is also often my song-writer. It’s hard to describe the intense feeling of singing a song that has been so beautifully constructed for you, tailor-made for you but somebody who knows and loves you. He and novelist Kazuo Ishiguro, have been collaborating on songs for me since 2007 on my album that year, Breakfast on the Morning Tram. The Ice Hotel was the first song they ever wrote for me. I knew something magical was happening… All of these musicians I play with understand that playing with a singer is about lyrics as much as anything else."
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CT - You speak french, english, portugese, where does your love and curiosity of languages and words come from?
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Stacey - "My Grandfather spent many years of his youth in France and spoke French, so I learned it from him. I think this early exposure to foreign languages gave me the interest, not just in languages, but in poetry and also in going out into the world. I think this accounts for why I love going on tour so much."
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CT - If you had the opportunity to play with an artist/musician, dead or alive / who would it be?
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Stacey - "I've met and performed with many of my heroes. I would have loved to have met and sung a duet with Elis Regina."
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CT - What are you listening to lately on your smartphone?
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Stacey - "I'm going to Brazil in August for some concerts with Marcos Valle, Edu Lobo and Dori Caymmi. I have have a lot of songs to learn and so that's what I'm listening to. As well as being work, it is joy. I don’t just listen to music on my smart phone though, I’m a big lover of audio books. Right now, I am finishing up a great read called Portuguese Irregular Verbs by Alexander McCall Smith.."
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Interview : Claude Thibault
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Stacey Kent
Sunday, July 3rd 2016 - 8pm
For more info on this concert, click here
To see the Tenderly EPK, click here
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kenny_barron_photo John Sann.jpgPianist Kenny Barron is ready for his three Invitation series concerts at the Gesù, with Lionel Loueke July 3rd, Elena Pinderhugues July 4th and his trio July 5th.
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It’s 10am, NY time. Kenny Barron picks up the phone on the first ring, obviously in great shape. Twenty years after his first carte blanche at the Montreal Jazz Fest, one of the hard-working master jazz pianists keeps looking for new challenges. He's hosting three Invitation series concerts this year. First on two nights his favorite formula : the duet (Lionel Loueke July 3 - Elena Pinderhugues July 4) then on the third night, with his trio, July 5th. “I’m ready” says the man with a well-assured voice.
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RB - A French singer/songwriter from your generation once declared that if he had not become a rock musician, he would have ended up in jail for civil unrest. What would Kenny Barron have become had he not played the piano in his life? To put this differently, do you picture yourself doing anything else in this world?
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KB - Well, right now, no! (Laughs) But many years ago, there were other things that I considered. Like becoming a writer. I enjoyed writing a lot. I don’t have the skills now - not anymore - but way back then, it’s really the only thing that I considered. Besides playing bass, ‘cause I was the double bass player for my school band in Philadelphia, the  All-City Highschool Orchestra. So these are the only two things I was tempted to do seriously, for a while. But neither one would have guaranteed a great income. So…(he laughs smoothly)
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RB - You’ve been coming to the Montreal Jazz Festival since the early 80’s. We’ve actually tracked back your band’s appearances back to 1983 followed with a first performance with you as headliner on October 29th, 1984, at the Bibliothèque nationale. Now, you’ve performed in more than 30 concerts over the past 36 years and finally, you get to treat yourself with three nights at the Gesu, part of the Invitation series. Does this feel as a gift, or more like a reward that’s been overdue?
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KB - No, not at all. I don’t see it as a reward that’s been a long time coming. I just feel happy that the opportunity came up. It never occurred to me like “Oh, I should be doing this”. I’m not familiar with the venue but I’m sure it’s gonna be fine. And I’m very grateful and honored to bring on Lionel Loueke and Elena Pinderhugues.
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RB - So let’s hear what you say about them. First Lionel Loueke: isn’t he amazing?
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KB - He is such an interesting guitarist. Not any “traditional”guitar player. He does other things. With his instrument and also with his voice. He kind of takes me on an adventure. We’ve played together as a duet once or twice. It is nice ‘cause he doesn’t play the standard kind of stuff.
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RB - What makes him so special, so unique? Is it his sound, his technique, his harmonic approach?
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KB - It’s really all of those, really. Definitely. He is really amazing.
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RB - Apart from what you’ve recorded with him on the 2008 album Traveller, what else can you tell us about what you intend to play that night?
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KB - Mmmm…I don’t know. With Lionel, I would kind of leave it up to chance. And actually, I kind of like that. We will probably play only original compositions but accessible stuff.
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RB - Tell us about Elena Pinderhughes. We barely know of her. How did this connection happen?
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KB - Yeah…She is starting to make a reputation for herself. She is a wonderful flautist from Berkeley. California. And her brother told me about her (he was one of my piano students at Julliard School). She came to New York to play at his senior recital and I finally got to hear her. I was amazed… She’s been working with Christian Scott lately, on tour, and she also had quite a few gigs with me. We did the Village Vanguard in December, for a week. You need to hold her on. And she’s pretty young. She’s still in college at  tje Manhattan School of Music. You will love her. Oh yeah…
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RB - You seem to be at ease working with artists from different generations. Is this the ultimate proof that you have remained young at heart?
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KB - I think it’s part of it! You know, surrounding yourself with younger people, we get different ideas and you get younger ideas. So it helps you to stay young snd hopefully makes your music to stay fresh and you don’t get stuck. That’s the one thing I don’t want. I don’t wanna get stuck.(*)
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RB - From the Trasher Dream Trio recordings with Gerry Gibbs and Ron Carter, one feels like asking: What’s your take on popular music -especially Soul, R&B- as compared to jazz?
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KB - (He bursts in laughter). Ha! The Trasher Drean Trio! That was a lot of fun. Older R&B, I like. I mean I listen to it still. When I was coming up I listened to a lot of Rh ythm and Blues. I listened to Do-whop. That was the music of the day in the 50’s, 60’s and 70’s. And also the popular music. I listened to Earth, Wind and Fire, people like that… I love that stuff. But I have to confess I’m not a big fan of hip-hop like some younger jazz players are.
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RB - -Not that you ever seemed to be in a race or of any kind of competition… but you remain a first runner up to your friend Ron Carter as “the most recorded jazz artist”.
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KB - (Lots of laughs) That’s all right! I’ll never catch up. He’s been on so many records. That’s OK.
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RB - Do you have any recollection or interesting insights of the Quartet you once had with him, Buster Williams and Dan Riley?
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KB - Yeah! It was a great group. Very successful. The only quartet with two basses. It was fun to do with an unusual concept. Ron played piccolo bass. We did our first recording live at Sweet Basil in The Village, downtown Manhattan. That was one of my favorite clubs.
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RB - You are really fearless. Should I mention previous duets you did with Jim Hall - Dave Holland - Chucho Valdes - Regina Carter - Stefon Harris? Jazz is an adventure, right?
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KB - It does mean that. Jazz is really an adventure and you learn something of every situation. For me, playing duo is probably the most difficult. But I enjoy playing that format because it's challenging. Very challenging.
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(*). Kenny Barron is 73 and will be presenting three concerts in the Invitation series at the Gesù part of the Montreal Jazz Fest

Kenny Barron Lionel Loueke
- Sunday July 3rd 6pm
Kenny Barron Elena Pinderhugues - Monday July 4th 6pm
Kenny Barron with Kyoshi Kitagama (bass) Jonathan Blake (drums) - Tuesday July 5th 6pm.
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Interview : Ralph Boncy
Photo : John Sann
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jks 150x150.jpgA few words and some music
with trumpeter Jacques Kuba Séguin in concert with Litania Projekt and the Quatuor Bozzini, July 8th at the 2016 Montreal Jazz Fest.
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We met trumpeter and composer Jacques Kuba Séguin who is presenting Friday, July 8th, part of the Jazz d'ici series of the 2016 Montreal Jazz Fest, a second album with Litania Projekt, with Fred Alarie on the bass, Jonathan Cayer at the keyboard and Jim Doxas on drums, in tandem avec le Quatuor Bozzini.

We spoke (in french) about his motivations and how this 2nd Litania Projekt happened, in tandem with the string quartet Quatuor Bozzini, the writing of the music, the I, II, III and IV movements l'Étude des Lueurs, a important piece of the album, what inspired him, european and polish jazz, the connection in between jazz and classical, with whom he would've liked to play with, the Litania Projekt band members and more...

Jacques treats us to a grandiose album where sensitive melodies and powerful music side in a fascinating and rich sound universe. Halfway in between improvisations and written music, this colorful and cinematographic, this musical portrait which contains a bit of melancoly, is never sad. In his writing process he had fun breaking the stylistic barriers that define classical music and jazz to create a genre-less music, accessible, and where the typical forms of each style are inverted.

On this album, Séguin, Alarie and Cayer, the heart of Litania Projekt, are connected and buoyed by a musical complicity that emerged in their 2015 tours in Germany, Poland and China. Drummer Jim Doxas joined the ensemble, laying rhythmic textures on the delicate soundscapes of eloquant pianist and virtuoso Frédéric Alarie.

Interview : Claude Thibault

to see the interview (in french), click here

Jacques Kuba Séguin
Litania Projekt
Quatuor Bozzini
Friday, July 8th 6pm at L'Astral
Jazz d'ici series of the FIJM 2016
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fred150X150.jpgFrédéric Alarie, Scott LaFaro's bass 12 hours a day and July 6th.
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Daring bassist Frédéric Alarie is following in the footsteps of famous bassist Scott LaFaro, Bill's Evan's sideman extraordinaire that completely changed the way bass was played. Taking hold of Scott LaFaro's bass, the same one that was in his car in a fatal accident 55 years ago, he invited us to a timeless meeting July 5th at the 2016 Montreal Jazz Fest.

Scott's bass was built in 1825 by Abraham Prescott in Concord (New Hampshire). LaFaro played with this bass until his death. It was badly damaged in that car accident. Sam Kolstein, a string instrument maker, had met Scott and took care of his instrument. He was greatly impressed by his talent. After LaFaro's death, he bought the damaged instrument from Scott's mother to restore it and bring it back to life. It's only many years later that his son Barrie, a string instrument maker as well, took on the very demanding restoration of the mythic instrument that he presented, completely restored, at the 1998 International Society of Bassists Convention in LA. Since then Barrie Kolstein has been the guardian of the precious instrument, lending it very seldomly for recording purpoises.

Bill Evans says about the Prescott LaFaro bass : « It had a marvelous sustaining and resonating quality. He [LaFaro] would be playing in the hotel room and hit a quadruple stop that was a harmonious sound, and then set the bass on its side and it seemed the sound just rang and rang for so long.»

Editors's note : A quadruple stop is bass talk that simply means playing on all four strings.

July 6th is a special date for Frédéric Alarie and this project. Scott LaFaro died July 6th 1951, Frédéric's current bass, La vie et la Mort, by string instrument maker Mario Lamarre,  came to the world July 6th 2013, the same exact day as the Lac Mégantic tragedy, and he recorded a project with Scott's bass July 6th 2016, exactly 55 years after the death of the famous bassist.
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CT : How did Scott'S bass end up in your hands and at this July 5th Montreal Jazz Fest concert?
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FA : June 2015, I received an invitation from Mark Dresser, internationally recognized bassist and curator for the International Society of Bassists (ISB) Conference in 2015, to give a concert in the New Music Summit Series, something he'd initiated at the 2009 Conference. The Series presents workshops and discussions on improvisation and  contemporary music concerts.  Following that concert, given at the Colorado State University, Nicholas Walker, another ISB official, introduced my to Barrie Kolstein, caretaker of  Scott LaFaro's bass, who offered a very rare opportunity, that of lending me the unique instrument for any project that I would like. I could then really discover the instrument and it's many possibilities.  Scott LaFaro, even though he was quite young, had a huge talent and dazzling dexterity that led him to revolutionise the way of playing the instrument, its role in a jazz  ensemble and an incentive to give "personality" to the bass. I've been listening Scott LaFaro since my teens and thanks to my mentor, Michel Donato, I discovered the bassist, his way of playing and his recordings. LaFaro is a singular musician that had a impact of change for a whole generation of bassists and musicians, just like me.
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CT : You highlight Scott LaFaro by presenting for this concert a repertoire from his different groups as well as playing solo, in trio with Bill Evans, in quartet with trumpeter  Joe Gordon, Pat Moran's Quartet with singer Bev Kelly and Ornette Coleman...tells us about this different groups and what you played July 5th.
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FA : From 1959 to 1961, he's in the Bill Evans Trio with drummer Paul Motian. The trio is booked to play for two weeks at NY's famous jazz club, the Village Vanguard. The group is getting a lot of attention for their original way of playing. The last night of the concert series, June 25th 1961, the complete concert is recorded and will become two albums :  «Sunday at the Village Vanguard» and «Waltz for Debby», considered to be some of the best jazz recordings of all time. Breaking with tradition where the bassist and drummer are confined to accompanying, the three musicians get into a three-way improvisation where the instruments each have equal say around the main musical theme. This interplaying - that constant synergy in between the musicians - give a specific and modern sound to the trio. Scott LaFaro is then one of the first bassists to get away from the «walking bass» and constantly exchanges with the soloist. LaFaro's amazing technique made this change possible. LaFaro died in a car accident July 6th 1961 in Flint (New York) four days after playing with Stan Getz at the Newport Jazz Festival. His death occurs ten days after the Village Vanguard recording with the Bill Evans Trio. LaFaro's tragic death was a shock for Bill Evans who was, according to drummer Paul Motian, stunned by grief, and in such as state of shock that "he was like a ghost" forcing Evans to take a breather of few months. Previously, Dec. 21st 1960, he recorded with Ornette Coleman's double quartet something that would lead to new directions in jazz : «Free Jazz:  A Collective Improvisation».

So I chose to play solo, and the range of groups ranging from the trio to the sextet for a resumé of groups Scott played with.
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Editor's Note : He was in concert with Sonia Johnson, voice / John Roney, piano / Ron Di Lauro, trumpet / Samuel Blais, saxophone / Andre White, drums.
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CT : How does one travel with such a valuable bass?
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FA : I drove down to Ithaca College (New York) to pick it up and brought it back the same way a few days ago.
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CT : You're also the owner of a great-sounding and superb bass by instrument-maker Mario Lamarre (La Vie et la Mort) built in 2013...how will you go back to that instrument ?
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FA : Yes, and that bass had won two prizes at the ISB Convention ; a "Howard" and the “Convention Favorite” at the instrument-makers competition.   I had the privilege of playing Scott LaFaro's bass twelve hours a day for three weeks. I'm a new man (musically speaking!)!
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CT : Did you record anything with Scott's bass?
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FA : Yes! It's done, I recorded a solo album with a few guests on a few tracks. More to come.
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Here's two videos from the July 5th, 20 16 concert, at l'Astral.

In Quintet with Sonia Johnson, John Roney, Ron Di Lauro, Andre White - You Don't Know What Love Is - it's here
In Quartet Samuel Blais, John Roney, Ron Di Lauro, Andre White - Solar - it's here

Interview : Claude Thibault
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christian 150.jpgTrumpeter Christian Scott, flutist Elena Pinderhugues and the magic of playing Stretch Music in Montréal.
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We met trumpeter bandleader Christian Scott who was at the Gesù for a three night stint at the 2016 Montreal Jazz Fest, part of the Invitation Series. He brought along flutist / singer Elena Pinderhugues who joins him on the three nights, the first June 30th, where he was presenting his own Christian Scott aTunde Adjuah project, then on the 2nd night with guitarist Charlie Hunter July 1st and finally with vocalist Lizz Wright on July 2nd.

We spoke about Christian's most recent Rising Star Composer in the 64th DownBeat Critics Poll for his compositional work, Elena's recognitions and flute playing, her brother Samora(he's on piano & keys) and playing music in the family, the fact she gets to play twice in the overall Invitation Series (she also played in the Kenny Barron Series), her definition - as well as Christian's - of Stretch Music, Christian's relationship with Montreal going back to 1999 with his great-uncle Donald Harrison Sr. and headlining his first band in 2008, the magic of playing in Montreal, Christian's last album Stretch Music, the titles and their social meaning, as well as his views on the politics of building walls as opposed to unifying people.

Interview : Ralph Boncy & Claude Thibault

To see the interview and a few concert clips, it's here

For more info, christianscott.tv
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bilal_150X150 pour primeur.jpgWe met R&B / nu soul artist Bilal at the 2016 Montreal Jazz Fest just a few hours before his July 6th Club Soda concert.

We spoke with R&B / nu soul artist Bilal about Soul Sista from his 1st Born Second album, which came first as an artist - classical or jazz, how he first sang in church choirs, how he fits in the R&B / nu soul scene, the story behind the title of his latest release In Another Life, and being a storyteller, some of the other titles and videos such as Money Over Love (with Kendrick Lamar) from In Another Life, the vibe of the album, the use of analog recording, hanging out in LA.

We go on about how he worked with Adrian Younge  after South by Southwest (SXSW) as well and jamming with him, how the critics are raving about his modern nu soul sound but it's really old school with a modern twist, more talk about  Bury Me Next To You which is really a sweet love song, and Holding It Back which is about Kama Sutra, his work with Robert Glasper and Kendrick Lamar, the future of hiphop and it's growing consciousness.

For the interview with Bilal, it's here

Interview by Ralph Boncy & Claude Thibault
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joey 150.jpgOrganist Joey DeFrancesco tells us about Trip Mode - his latest album, why it's called like that, What's Your Organ Player's Name inspired by a Miles Davis moment, and more...

We spoke with organist Joey DeFrancesco about his latest album ; Trip Mode, the meaning of it's title, the names of the tracks Who Shot John and  What's Your Organ Player's Name - inspired by a  Miles Davis moment, playing more than just the organ (he plays other keyboard instruments, the trumpet and sings), how he changed how the organ was played, the quality of the organ trio, his playing for the last year and a half or more with Jason Brown on drums and Dan Wilson on guitar, playing with George Benson, Miles Davis, Jack McDuff, John McLaughlin, his main influences Jimmy Smith and Miles Davis, his longtime domination of the organ in the Downbeat Readers and Critic's Poll, and finally how Ralph's family enjoyed Joey's 2014 Holiday Season Album.

For the interview with Joey, it's here

Interview by Ralph Boncy & Claude Thibault
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